Bike Shorts, Sept. 14, 2020

21 Sep 2020 2:47 PM | Anonymous member (Administrator)

Bike Shorts is published weekly. You are very welcome to suggest photos, cartoons, stories, events, links, etc. Just send your info to bikeshorts(at)knbc.ca

1. The Rides (Sept 15-21)

Changes in the tour schedule may occur at short notice. Please check the Club Calendar on the website, as well as your email, prior to heading to a start location. Cancellations and additions will be reflected on the calendar, as soon as the Tour Director or Assistant Tour Director is notified. Additionally, if a ride gets cancelled or changed, you will be notified by email. Tour leaders are reminded to contact the Tour Director at: tour-director@knbc.ca if any changes are required to their ride. Full details on all rides can be found on the KNBC Club Calendar of rides and events on the KNBC website. The KNBC Calendar, containing the most up to date info on your rides, is located at https://knbc.ca/page-18460

NOTE: If a ride is full, please join the waitlist. An overflow ride will be created if numbers warrant it.

Wed. Sept. 16

L2 – Major’s Hill Park – 43 km

L3 – Carp – 57 km

Sun. Sept. 20

L2, L3, L4  - Another Ottawa Valley Century - 105 km

2. Safety tip from Monna – HELMETS: After you crash & your helmet saves your head...

BANG! Hisss…! A Puncture! But whose bike? I’m riding in a peloton of 24 tightly packed riders at 34kph in the middle of the 42 degree banking on the Pan-Am Games Velodrome in Milton Ontario. It’s impossible to stay up on the banking after a puncture. Everyone is on edge - we know someone is going down and is going to take other riders with them. I’m a loser of this lottery. The rider with the puncture slides down in front of me and I flip over their bike, as four of us go down.

We untangle ourselves. No damage done I think … I get back on my bike to ride off the adrenaline and avoid stiffening up WITHOUT CHECKING MYSELF OR MY EQUIPMENT! As I calm down I realize I need to carefully assess my bike and myself… I get off the track and check. Well I have a contusion the size of a tennis ball on my shin, must be from hitting a bike, but not really a medical issue. And my bike is OK.

BUT my helmet is destroyed! (See the photo below). I didn’t even realize I’d hit my head! Obviously I hit it hard, and the helmet did its job. Now I have to assume head trauma could be a possibility. I removed myself from the training, borrowed another helmet, fitted it to me, made sure I was always where someone could monitor me, and I rode slowly on my own, off the track.

A checklist for after a rider crashes

The adrenaline will be pumping… an injured rider will not necessarily feel pain, and often will say “I’m OK” and want to get back on their bike. NO! Take it slow and do a thorough check:

Check the rider carefully for possible injury. Have them move all their limbs, stretch, and bend. Move their head around. Check for any discomfort, disorientation or dizziness.

Did the rider hit their head? Did anyone see if the rider hit their head?

Check the helmet very carefully for any dents or cracks, no matter how small.

Check the bike very carefully for any damage.

If there is any indication the rider hit their head, you must assume that a concussion or other head trauma is a possibility.

If at all possible, the rider is “done for the day”. Stop riding; pick them up in a car. Have someone stay with the rider at all times.

But in the middle of nowhere, that may not be possible… If the rider is not showing any symptoms, OK, ride slowly and carefully to where they can be picked up. Keep space around the injured rider, and watch them carefully, never leave them alone.

You should not ride with a damaged helmet! Treat your helmet with the respect it deserves

Helmets are “single use”… once they have done their job protecting your head in a crash; they are no longer effective and must be replaced (even if you don’t see any visible damage).

Check your helmet regularly for any cracks or dents… replace your helmet if you see any damage.

Bicycle helmets must be replaced every 5 years. If you ride a lot, every 3 years is best.

Check out this website: https://helmets.org/replace.htm

Be sure your helmet fits properly. Follow the 2V1 rule: 2 fingers spacing between your eyebrows and the edge of the helmet side straps form a V between the front and back of your ears, and join just below the ear. No more than 1 finger of space under the chin strap.

This CAN-BIKE Helmet Check video does a terrific job of explaining everything.

https://youtu.be/QkNQXbXa7YQ

3. Diversions

Video: Motherload (87 min). Tues., September 29 7 pm

Presented by Bike Ottawa & Let’s Bike Ottawa

An award-winning documentary that uses the cargo bike as the vehicle for exploring parenthood in this digital age of climate change. Motherload captures a new mother’s quest to understand the increasing isolation and disconnection of modern life, its planetary impact, and how cargo bikes could be an antidote.

https://www.eventbrite.ca/e/motherload-a-virtual-film-viewing-tickets-120100422597?aff=efbneb

Tour de poutine

The Township of McNab/Braeside’s Tour de Poutine is happen betweening Sept. 9 and Oct. 12.

https://www.insideottawavalley.com/news-story/10187741-2020-tour-de-poutine-underway-in-mcnab-braeside/?s=n1?source=newsletter&utm_content=a02&utm_source=ml_nl&utm_medium=email&utm_email=ef86f6a047d722b16ec799ff9ea473d1&utm_campaign=ovha_84089

Obituary of Peter McNichol

Peter McNichol was a founder of the Kanata Bicycle Club (1986) that eventually morphed into KNBC (1999). At that time he was a Kanata resident.

https://ottawacitizen.remembering.ca/obituary/peter-mcnichol-1079993346

Geoffrey Gurd, President, KNBC